What to consider when buying wood flooring?

March 5th, 2012 by admin | Print What to consider when buying wood flooring?

wood flooring

Wood flooring is heavily featured in many homes and across many business properties. If you are considering fitting wood during a home renovation or home improvement project you will need to consider the following.

There are two types of wood flooring, solid and engineered. Both are not the biggest fans of water and wet conditions, even if engineered wood flooring can withstand some degree of damp conditions. If the floor is likely to experience water on a large scale or left exposed to the elements, wood flooring may not be the most sensible choice. Furthermore, water that has been allowed to accumulate on wood can lead to a slippery surface, a major concern for slip and fall type accidents.

Have you considered the cost of fitting?
First time wood flooring buyers often neglect to budget the cost of fitting. Depending on the type of floor and your preferred choice of installation, it could cost an additional 30% to 40% on top of the cost of the floor. There are three methods of installing wood floors, which are floating, nail-down and glue-down.  Floating is the cheapest of the three and is regarded as the only method to suit do-it-yourself type projects. However, it is only suitable in the case of engineered wood floors. Solid wood flooring is only suitable for glue-down or nail-down installation due to the weight of the floorboards. As they are made from real wood, they tend to weigh to an extent that requires the floor to be fixed down solidly.

Are you aware of your ethical responsibilities?
As a buyer, you must insist that the wood, which you are buying, is sourced from sustainable resources. These are managed forests where wood is replenished to counter any trees that have been harvested. Before committing to the purchase ask the seller for their sustainability credentials. Often ethically sourced species will be oak flooring and walnut flooring. More exotic wood species are some times found on the endangered list so your decision to pick Oak or Walnut (including their sib-species) is ethically responsible.

Have you measured correctly?
Ordering the right amount of wood is the key to keep costs down and to avoid disappointment. The trick is to measure the right amount of M2 and to allow up to 8% on top for waste. A room should be measured for M2 based on the length X the width. Each room should be measured individually and the total X by 8% to allow for waste.  It is also useful to ask for a helping hand at this stage to ensure that the reading is accurate.

 

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